Medieval Tavern

A tavern of the later Medieval period might be imagined as a fairly substantial building of several rooms and a generous cellar.

MOC Medieval Tavern
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A tavern of the later Medieval period might be imagined as a fairly substantial building of several rooms and a generous cellar. Taverns had signs to advertise their presence to potential customers, and branches and leaves would be hung over the door to give notice that wine could be purchased. medieval taverns are also called The Ball, The Basket, The Bell, The Cross, The Cup, The Garland, The Green Gate, The Hammer, The Lattice, The Rose and two that were called The Ship. Medieval Drinks wine, mead, beer and spirits.
Inns appeared in England in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and were apparently fairly common, especially in towns, by the fifteenth century.Provincial capitals around 1400 could boast of 10 to 20 inns, market towns had 2 to 5 and small towns one.
people in the middle ages traveled a lot, threfore needed places where to stop for food, ale or wine, and to sleep. Inns offered local wine or ale, simple fare,and usually a large communal room where to crash. Pilgrims and occasionally other travelers could also stop at convents, nunneries, etc. and receive a simple meal of bread and soup and a place to sleep in a communal room, often sharing the bed with strangers.